Education, Engineering, STEM Resources

Professional Courses to Boost Your Resume

Are you an aerospace engineering professional looking to boost your resume? I have compiled a brief list of some short courses to help give you an edge in your career.

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics

AIAA On-Site Courses: Check out the website for a myriad of courses which your employer can bring right to your office from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model-based systems engineering to tactical and strategic missile guidance and so many more.

AIAA Online Education: Here you’ll find a long list of courses (of varying lengths) taught by industry experts. All courses are taught online, offering great flexibility.

The University of Kansas: KU Aerospace Short Courses

KU offers a wide variety of options for many disciplines within the aerospace profession. Check out the course catalog for the full list of 50+ classes with many options taught several times throughout the year and in multiple locations. Some examples are “Flight Test Principles and Practices”, “Structural Composites”, “Advanced Avionics” and “Project Management Fundamentals for Aerospace Professionals”. They also offer Certificates of Specialization with many specialties to choose from.

Southwest Research Institute: NASGRO Training

NASGRO is the most widely used fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth software program in the world. It was developed under a Space Act Agreement between SwRI and NASA. I have personally attended this training program and found it invaluable. It is a 3-day course which takes students through the very basic background of fracture mechanics, which is the basis for the program, as well as through each of the program’s modules with hands-on practice examples. Many industry leaders utilize NASGRO to ensure safe operation of structural components.

Dassault Systemes: Introduction to Abaqus

This course is currently offered online and teaches students not just how to model, submit jobs and view simulation results in the software program, but also teaches the technical basis the program utilizes to solve problems. Abaqus is the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) tool I utilized for my graduate school research.

Codecademy: Learn Python 2

Python has quickly become a favorite language due to its versatility and straightforward syntax. Because Python is open source, meaning it is freely available to the public and thus encourages open collaboration, there are many free resources available online. If you’re looking for something a little more structured, this course takes about 25 hours to complete, requires no prerequisites and promises to leave you comfortable enough with the basics to be coding your own script by the end. You can download Python for free here.

If there’s a class you’ve taken and highly recommend, drop a comment!

Education, Engineering

Top U.S. Aerospace/Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering Programs

I wanted to compile a short list of the top aerospace engineering programs in the United States. I’ve listed the top 5 here with their respective tuitions. Remember that this is not a comprehensive list and there are many great schools not listed here. Click the “full article” links on each category to see more options. Additionally, professionals working in the aerospace field can hold degrees in many other specializations like mechanical, chemical, electrical and software engineering, business, etc. Don’t let the dollar signs scare you as there are a multitude of scholarships, grants and other opportunities to help at least partially pay for school.

Further, as graduate school application season approaches, I’ve added the top aerospace graduate programs. I added a separate list for top online Master’s programs as many choose to pursue graduate programs while working a part or full-time job, and let’s not forget the unique challenges the COVID-19 pandemic has brought this year.

I also suggest checking out my other grad school related blog posts: 1) Is Grad School “Worth It”? and 2) Graduate School Application Tips.

Undergraduate Programs [full article]

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA)
    • $53,818/year (private)
    • enrollment: 4,530
  2. Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA)
    • $33,794/year (out-of-state), $12,682/year (in-state)
    • enrollment: 15,964
  3. California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, CA)
    • $56,862/year (private)
  4. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI)
    • $52,266/year (out-of-state), $15,948/year (in-state)
    • enrollment: 31,266
  5. Purdue University-West Lafayette (West Lafayette, IN)
    • $28,794/year (out-of-state), $9,992/year (in-state)
    • enrollment: 33,646

Graduate Programs [full article]

Cost of enrollment for full-time graduate programs is highly dependent on whether you are an in-state or out-of-state student and whether or not you obtain funding through a grant, scholarship, graduate research assistantship (GRA), graduate teaching assistantship (GTA), or other similar funding source. If you are interested in external funding for your graduate degree, apply early!

  1. California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, CA)
  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, MA)
  3. Stanford University (Stanford, CA)
  4. Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA)
  5. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor (Ann Arbor, MI)

Online Master’s Programs [full article]

If you choose to pursue your advanced degree while working, check with your employer and see if they’ll fully or at least partially reimburse you for courses or degrees related to your job. This is a great added benefit many companies offer.

  1. University of California, Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA)
    • $1,000/credit (out-of-state)
  2. Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN)
    • $1,348/credit (out-of-state)
  3. University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA)
    • $2,075/credit (private)
  4. North Carolina State University (Raleigh, NC)
    • $1,295/credit (out-of-state)
  5. University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign (Urbana, IL)
    • $670/credit (out-of-state)
Photo Credit: Kyle Sudu Photography

Wishing you fair winds and following seas wherever your journey takes you.

Kate

Engineering

What’s NASA’s Astronaut Application Like?

That’s one small step towards my childhood dream. In 2016 a record-setting 18,300+ people applied to be an astronaut. NASA chose 12. How do you like those .066% odds? This year, even with the additional requirement of a Master’s degree, NASA still received over 12,000 applications. One of them was mine. I think this may just be the most competitive job in the universe! Since the application changed a little bit this year, I thought I’d share with you what the application looked like.

Part 1: Build Resume in USAJOBS

This is probably one of the most time consuming parts of the application and can be quite frustrating. Although USAJOBS has an option to import your resume, for certain postings it requires you to use the USAJOBS Resume Builder. This is one of those positions. You will be required to manually enter each of your professional experiences individually and select whether you’d like to allow them to reach out to your supervisor. I would suggest that you only say yes if you are sure they’ll remember you and/or you’ve let them know you put them down. I felt like this process made it a bit difficult to set yourself apart from the crowd, but then again, I’m sure there are others who felt that way as well.

Part 2: Upload Required Transcripts

It’s a good idea to keep electronic copies of your college transcripts on hand because you never know when you’ll need them (ex. job applications, professional certifications like the P.E., etc). In addition to your USAJOBS resume, you will also have to upload and submit transcripts for all degrees you want credit for. If you do not upload these transcripts or other required documents as listed in the job posting, you will likely be disqualified right off the bat. You are not required to upload official transcripts but keep in mind that if selected, you will be required to provide official transcripts.

Part 3: Qualifying Questions

Just when you think you’ve completed the application and say to yourself “Wow, that was surprisingly simple” you submit and are routed to the agency specific section. Don’t worry, this isn’t difficult either. You’ll be asked questions that help further determine if you meet the basic requirements of the job listing and whether you understand the risks of the job, etc.

Part 4: Assessment

The assessment is something new this year. Within about 30 minutes of submitting the application, you will receive a link to the assessment which needs to be completed within 48 hours of the application closing. The assessment contains three parts and it is recommended to take the entire thing in one sitting but you can save it and come back if you’d like. The assessment is management by OPM (Office of Personnel Management), the federal agency responsible for managing the government’s civilian workforce.

Assessment #1: Work Experience Assessment. This one is not timed and about 25 multiple choice questions. The questions ask things like “When asked, your supervisor would explain your work style as” and then gives you a number of choices.

Assessment #2: OPM Essay Test. You will be given 25 minutes to write an essay which the system says will be graded by computer. The prompt I was given related to writing about the pros and cons to a particular subject. Astronauts are often the face of NASA and human spaceflight so I presume this is supposed to assess whether you are able to communicate effectively.

Assessment #3: Work Styles Assessment. This one felt like it went on and on…and on. It is non-timed and forces you to select one of two given options related to what describes you better in a work situation. Sometimes this is incredibly difficult as I often felt like neither choice applied to me and they both sounded like negative attributes to have! The ones I remember most were related to how you react to being stressed at work or how you feel when others at work are stressed out.

A helpful note is that once you have submitted your application, you are able to re-enter the system and make changes up until the application closes. Start your application early because it will likely take you longer to complete than you expect.

The selection process takes the agency approximately one year to complete and NASA plans to announce its next astronaut class sometime during early Summer 2021. I’ve heard a good sign that you may have made it into the running for the final interview round is if you hear that your references have been contacted.

For astronaut selection criteria and tips, click here to read my previous blog post. This post outlines the minimum requirements for NASA astronaut selection.

Godspeed friends,

Kate